HAZEL BURTON BUSH SCHOLARSHIP

HONORING LINEMAN INNOVATORS

THE HAZEL BURTON BUSH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Welcome to our Lineman Heritage Hub, where we celebrate Hazel Burton Bush, a pioneering lineman and inventor. Discover his impactful journey and contributions to the electrical industry.

Explore the Hazel Burton Bush Memorial Scholarship, a collaboration between Written in Red Training and Timpson Innovations, supporting the next generation of linemen. Apply for the scholarship or purchase exclusive products to contribute to lineman safety and progress while honoring Hazel’s legacy.

THE HAZEL BURTON BUSH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP​

Many critical innovations essential for lineman safety and efficiency have been spearheaded by linemen themselves. The spirit of progressive problem-solving has consistently been a crucial aspect of the trade, though history has occasionally overlooked the significance of these pioneers.

One such trailblazer was Hazel Burton Bush, a lineman and innovator who pioneered a work practice that has been commonly (and mistakenly) attributed to an engineer. In an effort to rectify this oversight and to support his nomination to the Lineman Hall of Fame, Written in Red and Timpson Training have partnered to establish the “Hazel Burton Bush Memorial Scholarship.”  This will be a $2000 scholarship given out every year for the next ten years at the International Lineman Rodeo in Kansas City in October.

Applications for the scholarship can be submitted through the International Lineman Hall of Fame:

There is no question that Hazel B. Bush was concerned for the safety of the linemen and was fully committed to developing live line tools and methods that would allow them to perform various tasks in a safe manner. He is a deserving addition to The International Lineman’s Hall of Fame as a standout pioneer of live line work methods.

Alan Drew

Author of The American Lineman​

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Support the Scholarship

Thank you for your donations to the Hazel Burton Bush Scholarship. 100% of the proceeds from these products directly fund the scholarship.

red/blue hat

$50

free shipping

Red and blue hat, featuring the phrase “Make Parallel Great Again” prominently showcased. Crafted with quality materials and designed for comfort, this hat is perfect for everyday wear.

neutral tones hat

$50

free shipping

A hat in neutral tones, featuring the phrase “Make Parallel Great Again” prominently showcased. Crafted with quality materials and designed for comfort, this hat is perfect for everyday wear.

red/gray/blue hat

$50

free shipping

Red and gray hat, featuring the phrase “Make Parallel Great Again” prominently showcased. Crafted with quality materials and designed for comfort, this hat is perfect for everyday wear.

gray/gray/orange hat

$50

free shipping

Gray and gray hat, featuring the phrase “Make Parallel Great Again” prominently showcased. Crafted with quality materials and designed for comfort, this hat is perfect for everyday wear.

Red Metal Tumbler

$50

free shipping


Red Metal Tumbler, featuring the phrase “Make Parallel Great Again” prominently showcased.

Hazel Burton Bush: Lineman and Pioneer

Hazel Burton Bush, born in Pappenville, Missouri, on January 9, 1880, emerged as an inventor and pioneer during the infancy of the high-voltage electrical industry. During this era, T.F. Johnson, a Lineman Hall of Fame recipient from the Georgia Railway and Power Company, also played a crucial role in developing live-line tools and work methods associated with energized conductors. While both were recognized as leaders in electrified tooling and work methods in electrical journals, Hazel Burton Bush’s contributions have been somewhat eclipsed, partly due to his untimely death on September 9, 1921. He was electrocuted while field testing a hot stick device designed to test failing insulators.

Educated at Denver University, Hazel Burton Bush began his career at Lacomb Lighting Co in Denver, later moving to a position with Littleton Electric Light and Power Co. in Littleton, Colorado. Subsequently relocating to Redlands, California, he joined Southern California Edison. In 1916, he and his father ventured out independently to establish the “Bush Electric Tool & Mfg. Company,” focusing on developing live-line tools for the electric industry.

Hazel Burton Bush was a courageous inventor who believed in himself against challenging odds. While his name may not be widely recognized by historians, it can be reasonably argued that it should be, as his work significantly contributed to saving lives. Notably, he is documented as the first lineman/inventor to conduct barehand energized work practices as early as 1918, a groundbreaking achievement that would take the industry 70 more years to fully adopt. During this time, he safely performed such work on 110 kV while operating from a specialized live line platform that he had personally developed.

Source Jim Patchen PG&E